Spring 2013 Course Schedule
Below you will find a complete listing of SFTS courses for Fall 2012. As one of the founding members of the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, SFTS is proud to be able to offer our students the opportunity to take GTU classes as well.

>> Click here to see theological educational opportunities through the GTU

>> For information about registration see the Academic Handbook

Dates to remember:
  • General Registration for Spring Semester Jan. 21-Feb. 1
  • UC Berkeley Spring Semester begins Jan. 22
  • Spring tuition payment due Jan. 25
  • PC(USA) Bible content exam Feb. 1
  • Instruction begins for Spring Semester Feb. 4
  • Late registration period $100 fee for initial registration in this period Feb. 2-15
  • UC Berkeley Cross-registration forms due to GTU registrar Feb. 8
  • End of late registration period Feb. 15
  • Deadline for making changes in enrollment without fee and for paying spring tuition without incurring late fee Feb. 15
  • Deadline for GTU thesis or dissertation defense without paying tuition Feb. 15
  • GTU MA applications for Fall due Feb. 15
  • Presidents' Day holiday Feb. 18
  • Housing applications due from returning students March 1
  • Intent to graduate in May '13, forms due to SFTS registrar March 15
  • Good Friday March 29
  • Last day to change enrollment $50 fee for changes April 5
  • Deadline to file GTU theses/dissertations, etc. April 5
  • Early Registration for Fall April 8-19
  • Limited enrollment requests due for Fall April 12
  • Financial aid applications for '13-14 due from returning students April 15
  • Shorter Catechism contest April 27
  • Spring Semester ends; SFTS Baccalaureate Service (afternoon) May 24
  • SFTS Commencement (morning) May 25
  • Last day to make up incompletes for Spring Semester June 14
  • Grades due June 14
Courses taught in San Anselmo unless otherwise noted.
Area I: Biblical Studies
   
BS-2006 Readings in Biblical Hebrew (1.0 Units) - Readings from the Hebrew Bible. 60 minutes a week. Pass/Fail only. No tests or papers. (Prerequisites: 2 semesters of Biblical Hebrew)
Professor: Annette Schellenberg
Class Schedule: Class day and time, TBA
Textbooks: NA
   
OT-3275 Old Testament Exegesis (3 Units) - The main purpose of this course is to introduce methods of critical study of the Old Testament and the application of these methods to the interpretation of biblical texts with a view to preaching or teaching in the church. This course also offers the opportunity to continue the study of Hebrew by reading passages at an introductory level.
Professor: Annette Schellenberg
Class Schedule: Mondays, Thursdays 8:30-10 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
OT-4139 Justice and Righteousness (3.0) - This course explores the topic of justice and righteousness in the Hebrew Bible. The focus will be on distinguishing different concepts within the Hebrew Bible (Deuteronomy and other legal texts; Wisdom and Psalms; Prophets; narrations) and connecting them with general Ancient Near Eastern ideas as well as with particular theologies of given writings. Fulfills SFTS requirement for second OT course after OT intro.
Professor: Annette Schellenberg
Class Schedule: Thursdays 2:10-5 p.m. at MUDD
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
NT-1004 New Testament Introduction (3.0 Units) - This course is a general introduction to the canonical and apocryphal Gospels and Acts in early Christian literature. Major methodological issues in current Gospel scholarship will be introduced first. Then, each text of the Gospels and Acts will be interpreted in terms of its literary characteristics, historical background and theological ideas. Finally, the question of the historical Jesus will be discussed. All along, explicitly or implicitly, hermeneutical implications of the critical interpretation of the bible will be raised and reflected upon.
Professor: Eugene Park
Class Schedule: Tuesdays 9-11:50 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
NT-2000 New Testament Exegesis (3 Units) - This is an introduction to the basic hermeneutical theories from Romanticism to post modernity and the standard exegetical methods currently practiced in New Testament interpretation. Theoretical discussion will be followed by interpretation of selected passages from various parts of the New Testament. Due attention will be given to the ordination exam of the PC(USA), while the course aims at wider applicability. Format: Lectures and discussions.
Evaluation: Final exegesis paper.
Professor: Annette Weissenrieder
Class Schedule: Mondays, Thursdays 8:30-10 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
NTHR-4610 BORDER: Terms-Ideologies-Performances (3.0 Units) - Nowadays borders are understood in general as more or less defined lines between cultures, languages, and political and religious systems. In antiquity, however, a "border" might not always have been conceived as a line marking territories, dominions, or spheres. For this course, such questions as the following arise: What are the relevant conceptualities and terminologies marking political, juridical, cultural, cultic, or religious distinctions? What terms seem to represent "border" and what did they signify in antiquity and was there a major shift from the frontality concept of the pre-modern times to a more linear model of borders? Were "borders" dividing one thing from another imaginary or real? Is (Early) Christianity a "religion" without borders? We will pursue this questions in light of theoretical frameworks (Hegel, Agamben, Bhabha), Whiteness Studies, ancient and modern narratives, visual images. In addition there will be a workshop on March 8, which involves scholars of religion in the Ancient Near East, the Bible, early Christianity, and early Judaism.
Professor: Annette Weissenrieder
Class Schedule: Mondays 2:10-5 p.m. at PSR
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
NT-5026 Gospel of Matthew (3 Units) - This is a seminar on the Gospel of Matthew. The class will discuss the history of scholarship in historical critical interpretation as well as various other more recent hermeneutical perspectives on Matthew. Both Hellenistic and Jewish background of Matthew will be studied in comparative terms. The first few sessions will be lectures by the instructor and the rest will be seminars with student presentations and floor discussions. Participation in class and a 20-page research paper will be required. (Introduction to NT and Greek; 12 max enrollment.)
Professor: Eugene Park
Class Schedule: Thursdays 9:40 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at MUDD
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info


Area II: Church History, Theology & Ethics
   
HS-1081 History II (3 Units) - Explores the role of Christianity in modern history, from the "Age of Discovery" to the present, surveying the spread of Christianity from Europe to the Americas, Africa, and Asia, with particular focus on the ways in which Christianity shapes and is shaped by society and
culture.
Professor: James Noel
Class Schedule: Tuesdays 2:10-5 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
HS-3325 The African Diaspora: 1490-1990 (3 Units) - Comparative historical study of blacks in West
Africa, the Caribbean, and the Americas. Offered in the Black Church Africana Religious Studies program.
Professor: James Noel
Class Schedule: Thursdays 11:10 a.m.-2 pm. at CDSP
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
HSHR-4800 History of Religion Seminar (3 Units) - Nowadays borders are understood in general as
more or less defined lines between cultures, languages, and political and religious systems. In antiquity, however, a "border" might not always have been conceived as a line marking territories, dominions, or spheres. For this course, such questions as the following arise: What are the relevant conceptualities and terminologies marking political, juridical, cultural, cultic, or religious distinctions? What terms seem to represent "border" and what did they signify in antiquity and was there a major shift from the frontality concept of the pre-modern times to a more linear model of borders? Were "borders" dividing one thing from another imaginary or real? Is (Early) Christianity a "religion" without borders? We will pursue this questions in light of theoretical frameworks (Hegel, Agamben, Bhabha), Whiteness Studies, ancient and modern narratives, visual images. In addition, there will be a workshop at March 8. (Intro to New Testament highly recommended.).
Professor: Annette Weissenrieder
Class Schedule: Mondays 2:10-3:30 p.m.
Textbooks: NA
   

ST-1084 Systematic Theology I (3 Units) - The first semester of a two-semester introduction to Christian theology. Beginning with the meaning of religious faith, we move into the method question of the relation between divine revelation and the authority of scripture, human reason and experience. From there, we investigate the meaning of God using ancient and contemporary Trinitarian theology; Reformed theologian John Calvin, feminist theologian Elizabeth Johnson, and Latin American theologian Gustavo Gutierrez. We conclude with differing understandings of creation, and God's relationship to human suffering. Three exams with option of substituting papers for exams). This course is the prerequisite for ST 1085, Systematic Theology II. (This course is taught by PhD student Joseph Conley with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Dr. Gregory Love.)

Professor: Joseph Conley
Class Schedule: Mondays, Thursdays 10:20-11:50 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
CE-2505 Environmental Ethics (3 Units) - An introduction to Christian ethics and to the literature of environmental ethics. Fulfills SFTS requirement for ethics elective, plus some other
schools' requirements. We will use public policy, philosophical, and theological perspectives to
approach ecological questions. Focus issue this semester is climate change. Assignments include
midterm exam plus final paper.
Professor: Carol Robb
Class Schedule: Tuesdays, Fridays 10:20-11:50 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   

RSCE-5003 Western Social Thought II (3 Units) - This seminar is a continuation of the History Seminar in the Fall semester, 2012, and is oriented toward preparing doctoral students for the general comprehensive exam in Ethics and Social Theory and is also open to advanced Masters students. The reading will include the social contract theorists, Kant, Hegel, and Marx plus other formative social theorists, and theologians who have incorporated social theory, such as Rauschenbusch and the Niebuhrs. Other possible theorists include Arendt, Foucault, Habermas, and Du Bois. Format to include some lecture, discussion, student presentations and exam

Professor: Carol Robb
Class Schedule: Thursdays 2:10-5 p.m. at CDSP
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info


Area III: Pastoral Care, Homiletics, Spirituality, Worship
   
NEW COURSE PS- Introduction to Pastoral Care (3 Units) - Pastoral Care is foundational to the role and work of the pastor.  Pastoral care is about the healing, guiding, sustaining and reconciling of persons and families.  Pastoral care is “the response of the church to the emotional, relational and spiritual needs of persons.”  This introductory course is designed to introduce the M.Div. student to the basic concepts, dynamics, issues and skills necessary for effective pastoral care.  It will examine the primary modes of pastoral care, including visitation, counseling, rituals, spiritual guidance and explore how pastoral care is distinguished from and yet interfaces with the ministries of preaching, education, evangelism and social justice. This course will teach both theory and the skills of pastoral care.
Professor: Scott Sullender
Class Schedule: Tuesdays, Fridays 8:30-10 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   

PS-2057 Organizational Structures, Group Processes and Family Dynamics (1.5 Units) - Pastoral practice is enhanced when pastoral care providers function out of a consistent and coherent theoretical base. This class is intended to enhance the theoretical basis of pastoral practice, and its application in pastoral care. Students will learn how families, groups and organizations function, how to most optimally use group processes, and how they function within groups. The purpose is to afford students the opportunity to grow in their capacity to observe how they and others function within families, groups, and organizations, and how to develop and maintain meaningful connections within group structures. The goal is to understand the factors that undermine as well as contribute to building a healthy community. New levels of self-awareness, prompted by theoretical development, will invite greater interpersonal awareness about self-in-groups, group dynamics, and how organizational structure affects group behavior. Learning strategies include lecture and/or video accompanied by discussion, discussion of assigned reading, written reflection in response to a series of questions (done outside class time), and assigned reading. Participants must commit themselves to the weekly class and to the process of theoretical/practical integration in order to receive credit. Priority to SFTS M.Div. C/PC Concentration students; SFTS M.Div. and GTU students admitted on a space available basis. (12 max enrollment).

Professor: Laurie Garrett-Cobbina
Class Schedule: Wednesdays 10-11:30 a.m.
Textbooks: NA
   
PS-5105 Assessment & Diagnosis (3.0 Units) – Assessment, Diagnosis and Treatment of Selected Problems in Psychological and Theological Perspectives. This course will assist pastoral counselors and other religiously oriented professionals to assess, diagnose and develop treatment plans for people with a variety of emotional and spiritual problems.  This course relates current psychiatric and systemic diagnostic categories and their differential treatment strategies to religious understandings of the human person, congregations, functional theological norms, and pastoral roles and tasks.  We will consider many of the more common psychological and relational problems, like depression, psychosis, anxiety, addictions, family dysfunctions. Case studies and other practical diagnostic exercises are the context and content of the course.  This is an advanced seminar for Doctoral students.  Full participation and regular attendance required.
Professor: Scott Sullender
Class Schedule: Mondays 1:15-4:30 p.m.
Textbooks: NA
   

PS-5149 Psychology of Religion (3.0 Units) – What is healthy religion? How does faith develop over the life cycle? What are the stages of the human life cycle? What are the opportunities for pastoral care and counseling at each stage of life? Students will study the contributions of key contemporary developmental theorists, looking at the needs, developmental tasks and role of faith at each life stage. We will explore this issue from the vantage point of scholars within and outside of the world of religion. We will look at several schemes of faith stages. We will understand the issue of a healthy faith within the context of a life span framework. Finally, we will explore how this perspective informs our work in pastoral care and counseling. This course is open to MA and M.Div. students with permission/interview. PIN code required.

Professor: Scott Sullender and Lily Stearns
Class Schedule: Mondays 8:30 a.m.-noon
Textbooks: NA
   

HM-1001 Introduction to Preaching (3.0 Units) – Introduction to the composition and delivery of sermons with attention given to hermeneutical and theological issues. Examination of selected homiletical models. Practice preaching. Instructor and class critique. Sermons recorded and reviewed. SFTS core course.

Professor: Jana Childers
Class Schedule: Thursdays 2-5 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   

HM-3260 Preaching and Performance (3.0 Units) – This workshop-style course provides a supportive
setting for students to prepare and perform sermons, focus on performance skills and explore various homiletical models. Performance will be considered as an exegetical tool as well as a discipline which undergirds the creative process and the preaching moment. In order to preach lively, textual sermons, students will develop their abilities to interpret Scripture and create sermon forms that foster movement and coherence. SFTS capstone course. (Introductory Biblical Studies OT and NT prerequisite.)

Professor: Jana Childers
Class Schedule: Mondays 2-5 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
RA-1709 Seminary Singers (1.0 Units) – Learning and performing various pieces of sacred
music in the SFTS choir. Pass/Fail only
Professor: Daniel Hoggatt
Class Schedule: Mondays 5:15-6:45 p.m.
Textbooks:  
   

SP-2527 Spiritual Life and Leadership (1.0 Units) – Social Discernment is a process of prayerful reflection and small group sharing that helps individuals (and, by extension, groups) to become clearer about how God is at work in systems and structures and might be calling to them to respond. This process can lead to action on behalf of more just systems and to a clearer understanding of the relationship between one's spirituality and action on behalf of justice. Learning strategies include: reflection and weekly written response to a series of questions, small group sharing, reading, and two brief reflection papers. Participants are asked to commit themselves to the weekly class and to
the whole discernment process in order to receive credit.

Professor: Nancy Wiens
Class Schedule: Wednesdays 8:30-10:10 a.m.
Textbooks: NA
   
FT-1068 Introduction to Ministry II (1.0 Units) – The first of three sequels to FT-1060, required for SFTS MDiv students. Prayer emphasis.
Professor: Sam Hamilton-Poore
Class Schedule: Mondays 1:30-4:30 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   

FT-1069 Introduction to Ministry III (1.0 Units) - The second of three sequels to FT-1060, required for SFTS MDiv students. Contextualization emphasis.

Professor: Martha Taylor
Class Schedule: Mondays 1:30-4:30 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   

FT-1070 Introduction to Ministry IV (1.0 Units) - The third of three sequels to FT-1060, required for SFTS MDiv students. Vocational Formation emphasis.

Professor: Leslie Veen
Class Schedule: Mondays 1:30-4:30 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
FT-1077 Advanced Academic English II (1.5 Units) – This course will feature practical strategies for becoming a better editor of your own and other people's writing. Coherence and clarity will be our focus. Topics will include organizing essays and structuring arguments effectively, as well as improving grammar and sentence-level mechanics. All levels welcome.
Professor: Heather Weidemann
Class Schedule: Tuesdays 7:10-8:30 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info


Integrative Studies
   
FE-4011 Internship (0-9.0 Units) – The internship provides a supervised ministry context in which the student develops and hones gifts and skills for ministerial leadership. The internship experience is designed to integrate studies and form M.Div. students in the art of ministry--an interactive learning process reflecting the Spirit's work of weaving together the person that God has created and called in Christ through the practice of ministry, theological reflection, spiritual formation, constructive feedback, critique and evaluation.
Professor: Leslie Veen
Class Schedule: NA
Textbooks: NA


Doctor of Ministry
   
DM-6010 Doctor of Ministry Supervision (6.0 Units) – For SFTS D Min students, preparation of the dissertation/project.
Professor: SFTS faculty
Class Schedule: NA
Textbooks: NA
   

DM-6013 Doctor of Ministry Supervision II (0 Units) – Dissertation/project stage of the SFTS D.Min. program.

Professor: SFTS Faculty
Class Schedule: NA
Textbooks: NA
   

DM-6014 Dissertation/Project Seminary (3.0) – Open only to SFTS D.Min. students.

Professor: Virstan Choy and Aart Van Beek
Class Schedule: Mondays 1:15-4:30 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   

DM-6019 (Cultural Milieu & Church Mission (3.0 Units) – This foundational seminar in the Doctor of Ministry program explores the interface between culture and mission/ministry. In this course, making use of the tools of the social sciences, students will become more aware of the issues, challenges and strategies for doing ministry in multicultural contexts. Students are encouraged to explore the unique challenges in their congregations or other ministry settings in this regard. As a first step, students will become more aware of their own "social position" and how that position shapes their understanding and practice of ministry, in order to better understand the cultural context of their congregation and their particular ministry challenge. The instructor will place all of this in a larger theological context, knowing that from the beginning of the Church in Acts 2, ministry and mission have been multicultural and global in scope. This course is essentially interdisciplinary, exploring issues from both social and theological perspectives, and holding constructive dialogue across disciplines to further enrich and strengthen ministry in our times.

Professor: Virstan Choy, Martha Taylor
Class Schedule: Mondays 8:30 a.m.-noon
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   

DMPS-6049 Psychology of Religion (3.0 Units) – What is healthy religion? How does faith develop over the life cycle? What are the stages of the human life cycle? What are the opportunities for pastoral care and counseling at each stage of life? Students will study the contributions of key contemporary developmental theorists, looking at the needs, developmental tasks and role of faith at each life stage. We will explore this issue from the vantage point of scholars within and outside of the world of religion. We will look at several schemes of faith stages. We will understand the issue of a healthy faith within the context of a life span framework. Finally, we will explore how this perspective informs our work in pastoral care and counseling. This is a doctoral seminar. Full student participation and regular attendance is required. Admission to the SFTS DMin program in Pastoral Care; PIN code required. In addition to D.Min. students, this course is open to MA and M.Div. students with permission/interview.

Professor: Scott Sullender and Lily Stearns
Class Schedule: Mondays 8:30 a.m.-noon
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
DMPS-6100 Clinical practicum (0 Units) – Admission to the SFTS D.Min. in Pastoral Care
Professor: Scott Sullender
Class Schedule: NA
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
DMPS-6105 Assessment & Diagnosis (3.0 Units) – This course will assist pastoral counselors and
other religiously oriented professionals to assess, diagnose and develop treatment plans for people with a variety of emotional and spiritual problems. This course relates current psychiatric and systemic diagnostic categories and their differential treatment strategies to religious understandings of the human person, congregations, functional theological norms, and pastoral roles and tasks. We will consider many of the more common psychological and relational problems, like depression, psychosis, anxiety, addictions, family dysfunctions. Case studies and other practical diagnostic exercises are the context and content of the course. This is an advanced seminar for Doctoral students. Full participation and regular attendance required. (Admission to SFTS D.Min. in Pastoral Counseling program required.)
Professor: Scott Sullender
Class Schedule: Mondays 1:15-4:30 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info

 
 
 

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