Summer Seminars June – July 2014

Summer Seminars
June – July 2014

All classes are offered for two weeks from 9:00am to 12:30pm unless otherwise noted. Classes marked with an * indicate that permission is required from the professor before enrollment can be finalized. To obtain permission, please contact Gail Priestley at gpriestley@sfts.edu.

Tuition for continuing education students is $600/course. Room and meals (lunch and dinner on weekdays) for one week is available for a cost of $450, and for two weeks at a cost of $900.

To register, please complete the form below and submit to the Program Manager for Advanced Pastoral Studies, Gail Priestley. You may do so either via e-mail to gpriestley@sfts.edu or via mail to 105 Seminary Road, San Anselmo, CA, 94960 to the Attention of Gail Priestley. For any questions or assistance, you may call Gail at 415.451.2865.

Session 1
June 9, 2014 – June 20, 2014

1. Theology of Ministry: God and Human Suffering
Dr. Gregory Love, Associate Professor of Systematic Theology, SFTS

If God loves us like a mother or father loves her or his child, why do horrific things happen to us or to those we love? Where is God when these horrific things happen? This course looks at four Christian views of God’s relation to human suffering, and allows students to develop their own understandings of God and human pain.

2. Assessment, Diagnosis, and Clinical Theology*
Dr. Scott Sullender, Associate Professor of Pastoral Counseling, SFTS

This course will teach students how to think theologically about psychological issues.  In reviewing the major issues and approaches to the assessment and diagnosis of psychological and relational problems from a pastoral perspective, we will look in detail at the prevailing diagnostic scheme based on the DSM-IV, reflect on various diagnoses from theological perspectives, and suggest ways that the DSM-IV system could be augmented by a spiritual axis. We will look at several of the more common assessment tools used by pastoral counselors today and give students opportunities to become thoroughly acquainted with at least one tool. We will also dig deeply into how we understand some of the more common psychological problems—depression, anxiety, obsessions and impulse control problems—from both psychological and theological perspectives. 

3a. Leading Adaptive Action in Communities of Faith
June 9 – June 13, 9:00am – 5:00pm
Dr. Mary Hess, Associate Professor of Educational Leadership, Luther Theological Seminary

What does adaptive action look like in communities of faith? Identifying the differences between technical and adaptive challenges only goes so far. This course will support the framing of effective community adaptive action, nourish students'  personal resources for navigating systemic change, and draw on the deep theological resources of specific congregations. Students will work with case studies, explore various "art of hosting" techniques for open source change, and engage in a variety of contemplative practices to sustain their faith in the midst of dynamic change. Authors engaged will include Robert Kegan, Glenda Eoyang, Royce Holladay, Scott Cormode, and authors from within the theological traditions the students bring to the class

3b. Jazz, Traditions, Leadership: Complex Systems and Open Histories
June 16 – June 20, 9:00am – 5:00pm
Dr. Christopher Ocker, Professor of Church History, SFTS

What are the critical, theoretical foundations of effective spiritual leadership? How does a spiritual leader know oneself as a participant in a dynamic system? How do theological, sacramental, mystical, and ethical traditions relate to dynamic systems? And how is leadership like jazz, whose dynamic method of improvisation arises out of a particular African-American historical context?

In order for a leader to be an effective catalyst and manager in a dynamic system, he or she must comprehend how it works. One must possess “social intelligence,” and the study of history builds social intelligence. Second, religious systems have peculiar qualities. They rely heavily on traditions and spiritual sources of knowledge. Religious systems are “open,” subject to a constant stream of inputs that affect the system in unpredictable ways, causing indirect outcomes. As such, they have a tendency to elude hierarchical or even collective controls imposed by a group working collaboratively. This seminar examines religions and religious communities as complex systems, and will introduce students to the rise of the science of complex systems in the twentieth century; the impact of this field on economics, political science, sociology, and theology; and its implications for organizational leadership today.

4. ONLINE COURSE: Basic Theological Questions in the Old Testament
Dr. Annette Schellenberg, Associate Professor of Old Testament, SFTS.

In the Old Testament, many theological questions are addressed that are still relevant for our own theological thinking. In this course, we will study the different Old Testament answers given to these questions and then extend the Old Testament discourse to our own time.
 
This course will examine such questions as:  Who is God? How is God present among humans? How do humans know about God? What is nature/creation? How does God act in history? What is the human nature? What is sin and what can be done about it? How shall God be worshipped? What is the relationship of “us” and “the others”? How can the world be a place of justice and peace?

Session 2
June 23, 2014 – July 4, 2014

1. Pastor as Person
Dr. Lily Lue Stearns, Clinical Supervisor, Berkeley Christian Counselors and Adjunct Faculty, SFTS

This foundational seminar considers each student’s experience as a ministry practitioner—with her/his unique personal traits, relationships, talents, and limitations-- as he or she confronts the expectations, tensions, and other complex realities that accompany the practice of ministry and leadership. Serving as an opportunity to share personal and professional issues with ministry peers, the course focuses on the themes of calling, spiritual leadership, self-awareness, family and congregational systems, and spiritual disciplines.

2. Pastoral Care in Times of Crisis: Loss, Grief and Trauma in Theological and Psychological Perspectives*
Dr. Daniel Schipani, Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling, Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary

This course consists of an in-depth practical-theological exploration of pastoral care ministry in crisis situations. It includes principles—dependable guides to practice—of prevention, early intervention, and recovery, in light of a vision of pastoral wisdom and of the church as an ecology of care, healing and wholeness.  Those whose ministry focuses on the spiritual nature and care of God’s people in congregations and other ministry settings (e.g. health care centers) will find the course particularly useful in terms of their ongoing personal-spiritual, academic, and professional-ministerial formation.

3. Teaching and Preaching from a Critical Womanist Pedagogy
Rev. Vanessa Hawkins, Interim Director for the Program in Christian Spirituality, SFTS
This course will examine the intersections of biblical studies, critical theories, and religious education. Critical pedagogies examine assumptions about social relationships, the relation of text(s), the production of knowledge, power, and the construction of identities. Using a liberating biblical pedagogy, this course will explore biblical texts from womanist and postcolonial perspectives to examine how social constructions intersect in biblical interpretations, texts, readers, and contexts.

4. ONLINE COURSE: Basic Theological Questions in the Old Testament
Dr. Annette Schellenberg, Associate Professor of Old Testament, SFTS.

In the Old Testament, many theological questions are addressed that are still relevant for our own theological thinking. In this course, we will study the different Old Testament answers given to these questions and then extend the Old Testament discourse to our own time.
 
This course will examine such questions as: Who is God? How is God present among humans? How do humans know about God? What is nature/creation? How does God act in history? What is the human nature? What is sin and what can be done about it? How shall God be worshipped? What is the relationship of “us” and “the others”? How can the world be a place of justice and peace?

5. Leaders for the Journey: Pastors for Times of Exodus
Dr. Virstan Choy, Director of Advanced Pastoral Studies and Associate Professor of Ministry

While some observers characterize the crisis experienced by churches-- congregations as well as denominations-- as exile, others propose seeing the predicament as a time of exodus. What if churches--the latest generation of "People of the Way"-- are "on the way" to a new "place" (in society, in the hearts and minds of people)? What kind of leadership and leadership skills are needed by a church "on the way" to something new? This seminar in the Executive Leadership concentration of the D.Min. program will explore that question with the help of literature on disruptive leadership, innovative leadership, as well as adaptive leadership.

Session 3
July 7, 2014 – July 18, 2014

1. Culture and Mission: Social Theory for Theologians
Dr. Carol Robb, Margaret Dollar Professor of Christian Social Ethics, SFTS

This foundational seminar in the Doctor of Ministry program explores recent social theory as it informs contemporary pastoral theologians’ mission and ministry. In this course students will explore developments in religiosity in the global context and in the national context, and make an effort to understand these developments as social phenomena. We will also explore the moral and theological challenges generated by the current multicultural context, reflect upon our social locations in this context, and clarify the grounding for mission. In addition to the written texts, we will use the texts of our own experiences.

2. How People Change: Dynamics across the Spectrum of Individuals, Families and Congregations*
Dr. Scott Sullender, Associate Professor of Pastoral Counseling, SFTS

This course will explore the dynamics of change, what prompts change, what blocks change, and how change occurs on multiple levels: the intrapsyche, interpersonal and organizational, and how these multiple levels are interrelated.  To accomplish this task, we will explore the basic theories of change and change models, drawing on the insights from organizational psychology, family systems theory, psychology of religion and the various theories of psychotherapy. 

3. Womanist Theology as Social Practice
Dr. Andrea C. White, Assistant Professor of Theology and Culture, Emory University Candler School of Theology

This course will rely on African American women's religious experience as an interpretive lens through which to reflect theologically on issues of embodiment, politics and culture. The study will demonstrate the innovative interventions of womanist theology on belief and social practice in communities of faith that take seriously prophetic justice and issues of race, class, and gender.

 


 
 
 

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