Courses & Schedules - Fall 2012
Below you will find a complete listing of SFTS courses for Fall 2012. As one of the founding members of the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, SFTS is proud to be able to offer our students the opportunity to take GTU classes as well.

>> Click here to see theological educational opportunities through the GTU

>> For information about registration see the Academic Handbook

Dates to remember:
  • General registration begins Aug. 20
  • Move-in period begins Aug. 20
  • Fall tuition due Aug. 31
  • Fall semester begins Sept. 4
  • Opening Convocation Sept. 12
  • End of late registration Sept. 14
  • Applications due for 2013 GTU MA Spring Sept. 30
  • Filing deadline for GTU theses/dissertations Oct. 3
  • Early registration for Intersession & Spring begins Nov. 5
  • Deadline to change enrollment Nov. 9
  • Restricted enrollment for Spring 2013 due Nov. 9
  • Fall semester ends Dec. 14
  • Requests for incompletes due Dec. 14
  • Grades due for Fall semester Jan. 4
  • Last day to make up incompletes Jan. 4
Courses taught in San Anselmo unless otherwise noted.
Area I: Biblical Studies
   
BS-1002 Basic Greek I (3 Units) - Introduction to basic grammar and vocabulary needed to begin reading biblical Greek. This course or the equivalent is a prerequisite for Basic Greek II, the intensive course given during January Intersession.
Professor: Polly Coote
Class Schedule: Mondays, Thursdays 10:20-11:50 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
BS-1120 Basic Hebrew I (3 Units) - An introduction to the basic phonology and morphology of biblical Hebrew. This course or the equivalent is a prerequisite for Basic Hebrew II, the intensive course given in January Intersession.
Professor: Robert Kramish
Class Schedule: Tuesdays, Fridays 10:20-11:50 a.m
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
BS-2006 Readings in Biblical Hebrew (1 Unit) - Readings from the Hebrew Bible. 60 minutes a week. Pass/Fail only. No tests or papers. Class day and time TBA; please e-mail instructor for more information. [Prerequisites: 2 semesters of Biblical Hebrew]
Professor: Annette Schellenberg
Class Schedule: NA
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
BS-4000 Advanced Greek I (3 Units) - This course is an exercise for reading comprehension of Classical Greek by closely studying selected portions of The Symposium written by Plato, which is one of the best known texts in Attic Greek. The class will translate the text and discuss the grammatical features focusing on the syntax of each sentence and morphology of the vocabulary. Pertinent philosophical ideas of Plato will also be discussed as they shed light on the conceptual background of the given text. For those who only read Koine Greek, there will be a brief introduction to Classical Greek in the beginning of the course.
Professor: Eugene Park
Class Schedule: Tuesdays 9:40 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at CDSP
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
BS-4002 Advanced Hebrew Reading (3 Units) - Reading of poetic and advanced texts.
Professor: Annette Schellenberg
Class Schedule: Fridays 12:40-3:30 p.m. at CDSP
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
BS-6030 Exegesis Group (1 Unit) - This course is an opportunity for doctoral students of the biblical area to present the current stage of their dissertations in 20 minutes presentations, followed by 40 minutes of discussions with other doctoral students and faculty.
Professor: Annette Schellenberg, Annette Weissenrieder
Class Schedule: Tuesdays 7:10-9:10 p.m. at CDSP
Textbooks:  
   
OT-1200 Pentateuch & Former Prophets (3 Units) - This course introduces the text, history, and theology of the first nine (eleven) books of the Hebrew Bible (i.e. Genesis through Kings) in the context of ancient Near Eastern culture; the history of the biblical period from early Israel to the Persian period; and the nature of critical study of the Bible. It assumes no prior study of the Bible. SFTS core course.
Professor: Annette Schellenberg
Class Schedule: Tuesdays, Fridays 8:30-10 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
NT-1005 Intro to New Testament (3 Units) - Paul. The Pauline letters emerge in social and complex political context of the Roman Empire. This course examines the Pauline letters and contemporaneous texts within their first-century Greco-Roman contexts (especially Jewish contexts), pays attention to archaeological and inscriptional materials of the time, and demonstrates contemporary hermeneutical strategies, including feminist and postcolonial. Students will also consider the controversial contemporary contexts in which they and others interpret the New Testament.
Professor: Annette Weissenrieder
Class Schedule: Mondays, Thursdays 8:30-10 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
NTST-3512 Interpreting the Body in New Testament and Theology (3 Units) - This interdisciplinary course will engage the following questions: How is the body, its gender and sexuality imagined? How is it related to purity code and law? Is the dichotomy between body and soul actually biblical, and what other ways of conceptualizing the human being can be found? What is meant when biblical texts speak about the inner and outer human being? How is this distinction related to the distinction of body and soul? How is the body portrayed as affected by death and resurrection? And finally, how might we imagine a biblical and theological hermeneutics of the body? The course will engage texts from New Testament, ancient medical and philosophical sources, as well as Jewish sources. The theological discussions will include materials from a variety of theological sources, philosophical, medical, and psychological discourse and popular culture. Intended audience: M.Div., MA, PhD certificate students. We recommend introductory New Testament and Theology classes as helpful prerequisites. [Auditors with faculty permission]
Professor: Annette Weissenrieder, Marion Grau
Class Schedule: Mondays 2:10-5 p.m. at CDSP
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
NT-4380 New Perspectives on Paul (3 Units) - This seminar will examine some of the recent trends in Pauline scholarship, especially the "New Perspective on Paul," which is regarded as a critical paradigm shift in Pauline studies in the 20th century CE. We will explore the concept of “covenantal nomism” to see if it indeed provides a common soteriological ground in Palestinian Judaism from 200 BCE to 200 CE. We then will try to interpret some of the major themes and key passages from Pauline epistles from these new perspectives and see what hermeneutical impacts they generate in terms of Jewish-Christian relations. [Greek]
Professor: Eugene Park
Class Schedule: Thursdays 9:40 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at MUDD
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
NTST-6512 Interpreting the Body in New Testament and Theology (3 Units) - This interdisciplinary course will engage the following questions: How is the body, its gender and sexuality imagined? How is it related to purity code and law? Is the dichotomy between body and soul actually biblical, and what other ways of conceptualizing the human being can be found? What is meant when biblical texts speak about the inner and outer human being? How is this distinction related to the distinction of body and soul? How is the body portrayed as affected by death and resurrection? And finally, how might we imagine a biblical and theological hermeneutics of the body? The course will engage texts from New Testament, ancient medical and philosophical sources, as well as Jewish sources. The theological discussions will include materials from a variety of theological sources, philosophical, medical, and psychological discourse and popular culture. Intended audience: Doctoral students. [Auditors with faculty permission]
Professor: Annette Weissenrider, Marion Grau
Class Schedule: Mondays 2:10-5 p.m. at CDSP
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info


Area II: Church History, Theology & Ethics
   
HS-1080 History I (3 Units) - Christianity: From Jewish Sect to Colonial Religion, 100-1700. A study of Christianity from the second century through the Reformation. Introduction to its history in the Roman Empire, Central and east Asia, North Africa and the Byzantine Empire. Closer examination of Christianity's place in the development of Europe, from tribal societies to early modern states. Strong emphasis on the interpretation of historical texts in translation. SFTS core course
Professor: Christopher Ocker
Class Schedule: Mondays, Thursdays 10:20-11:50 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
HSST-4317 Religionless Christianity (3 Units) - From 19th-Century liberalism to the Emerging Church. Since the mid-19th century, a variety of intellectual currents within Protestant Christianity have questioned the ability of the church to encompass or embody the teachings of Christ. These movements have tried to articulate a transition from traditional to post-ecclesial forms of Christianity. Such currents once played a major role in the accommodation Protestant denominations to modernity and secularism. They helped shape the Ecumenical movement. Since the steady decline in the membership of Ecumenical Protestant churches in the 1970's, and with the rise of evangelicalism in American public life, these older theological currents have met with complex and paradoxical responses. The old liberalism is perceived as a contributor to the decline of old denominations. Yet the Protestant-liberal's "religionless Christianity" touches on themes also prevalent in the discourse of "emergent" Christianity. This seminar will study these currents in the broad context of "secularization", a concept that will be questioned and evaluated in the light of recent work. Figures studied will include the 19th-century Lutheran theologian Richard Rothe; the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche; the Indian Anglican mendicant Sadhu Sundar Singh; the dialectical theologians Karl Barth, Paul Tillich and Dietrich Bonhoeffer; the secular theologians Harvey Cox and Mark Taylor; and the philosophical theologian Philip Clayton. Readings will also include the sociologists Max Weber, Robert Bellah, and Jose Cassanova; the philosopher Charles Taylor; the anthropologist Talal Assad, and the American historian David Hollinger. Seminar format: readings, leadership in discussion, final research paper on an original topic related to the course.
Professor: Christopher Ocker
Class Schedule: Tuesdays 2:10-5 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
ST-1085 Systematic Theology II (3 Units) - This course is the second semester of a two-semester introduction to Christian theology. The purpose is to help the student gain a basic knowledge of the principal topics of the theology of the universal church, especially as these topics are understood in the Reformed tradition and in conversation with feminist and other contemporary theologies. Beginning with the doctrine of humanity, we look at our original goodness and our fall into relational forms of sin as pride, despair and denial.  Next, we look at the person and work of Jesus Christ, from a variety of perspectives.  We look deeply at the meaning of our being “saved by grace through faith alone,” and the roles of the divine Spirit and human spirit in bringing about our healing.  We conclude with the nature of the Christian spiritual life, including sanctification and vocation, the church and its mission in the world and sacraments.  (ST-1084 is a prerequisite for this course.)
Professor: Rebecca Prichard
Class Schedule: Tuesdays, Fridays, 10:20-11:50 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
STSP-4175 Nature & Grace in Celtic Faith (3 Units) - This course will consider the problems and possibilities for Celtic Christian Theology with a special focus on human nature, grace, revelation and the natural world. We will consider the history of Celtic culture and the way Celtic Christians expressed their faith in the British Isles. We will struggle honestly with the question: was there a Celtic Church? Poetry, liturgy, prayers, art and spiritual writings from this tradition will help us see how Celtic Christians viewed humanity, creation and the gracious presence of God in their lives and environment. We will compare the writings of neo-Celtic authors to classic Christian texts on nature and grace. Augustine, Pelagius, Aquinas, Calvin and others will be in conversation with Celtic thinkers on topics such as Scripture, human nature, natural theology and spirituality. Lecture, discussion, reading, student presentations and visual arts will be employed in this upper division seminar for MA and M.Div. students.
Professor: Rebecca Prichard
Class Schedule: Thursdays 2:10-5 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
CE-2497 The Christian & the Animal Other (3 Units) - Christianity accords each animal an intrinsic goodness that calls forth our care. And yet we must also attend to human well-being. How well are Christians meeting the challenge of balancing human and animal needs? This course is an introduction to both Christian ethics and the animal ethics/theology literature. Along the way, we'll explore topics such as the dualism that underlies Christianity's longstanding neglect of (both your own and their) animal bodies, the logic behind PETA's embrace of species-equality, and why the farm sanctuary movement may offer the most vivid contemporary expression of "Sabbath rest." Lecture and discussion format; required classroom participation, reflection papers, take-home midterm, and 10-12 page "moral argument" paper. May meet your school's requirement for an introductory ethics course (see your advisor).   
Professor: PhD student Mary Ashley under the supervision of Dr. Carol Robb.
Class Schedule: Thursdays 2:10-5 p.m. at MUDD
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
CE-2501 Economic Justice (3 Units) - This course is an introductory course in Christian social ethics, designed to share the language and concepts of the discipline of ethics and bring them to bear in ways accessible to Christian communities and unchurched publics.  The content of our reading and discussion concerns what economic justice means in our time.  The reading material includes philosophical, political, historical, and theological perspectives.  The focus issue this semester is food and not enough food, or hunger.  Because the Food and Farm bill is being negotiated this autumn, we will want to build some capacity to exert influence on food policy.
Professor: James McDonald, Carol Robb
Class Schedule: Tuesdays, Fridays 10:20-11:50 a.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info


Area III: Pastoral Care, Homiletics, Spirituality, Worship
   
PS-2056 Pastoral Care Service Project (1 Unit) - The Pastoral Care Service Project provides a way to live out the Christian conviction that pastoral care is ultimately a theology of service. Out of involvement with persons in need, and feedback from peers and instructor, students develops new awareness of themselves as persons and of the needs of those they serve. From theological reflection on specific human situations, students gain a new understanding of pastoral care ministry. Participating student will choose one of the following (as available and with permission of service site administrator): (a) Assist the SFTS Chaplain or SFTS Professor of Pastoral Counseling by serving as the student chaplain on-call, reporting to both the Shaw Chair for CPE (for support and performance feedback) and the SFTS Chaplain or Professor of Pastoral Counseling (for administrative direction and performance feedback); or (b) A service mission directed by the Shaw Chair for CPE that may be on or off campus, public or hidden, and that stresses leadership and service. This service mission will directly engage care-giving with the disadvantaged and address structural issues which underlie unjust systems. Participants must commit themselves to the provision of pastoral care through the service project in order to receive credit. [Admission to the SFTS M.Div. concentration in Chaplaincy and Pastoral Care]
Professor: Laurie Garrett-Cobbina
Class Schedule: NA
Textbooks:  
   
PS-5041 Trauma, Loss and Grief (3 Units) - Caring for the bereaved has been at the heart of pastoral ministry. In more recent times, the incident of trauma, violent death and complicated grief is growing.  This course explores current psychological, relational and theological perspectives on loss and grief, life and death, trauma and trust, and healing and hope, as they manifest themselves in individuals, families and congregations.  We will give special attention to the appropriate use of pastoral tools, like ritual, scripture and prayer, in a ministry that focuses on these challenges.
Professor: Scott Sullender
Class Schedule: Mondays 8:30 a.m.-noon
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
PS-5151 Theories of Counseling (3 Units) - This fall we will explore the major schools of counseling and related theories of personality.  As we move through this survey course, two questions will guide us.  One, how do people change and grow, and how do we understand change both psychologically and theologically.  Psychotherapy and religion both claim to be systems that help people change.  Secondly, what is pastoral counseling today?  How do we define pastoral counseling in the 21st century?   Through this course, each student will be able to build her or his personal theory of pastoral counseling, including a theory of change. Our eye will be toward building an integrative theory of pastoral care and counseling that fits the context of today's pastoral counselor and the needs of today's parishioner.
Professor: Scott Sullender
Class Schedule: Mondays 1:15-4:30 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
LSFT-2525 Reformed Worship (3 Units) - Fulfills most PCUSA presbyteries' requirement for
a course on worship and sacraments and prepares candidates to take the PCUSA standard ordination
exam in worship and sacraments.
Professor: Jana Childers
Class Schedule: Thursdays 2-5 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
RA-1709 Seminary Singers (1 Unit) - Learning and performing various pieces of sacred
music in the SFTS choir. Pass/Fail only.
Professor: Daniel Hoggatt
Class Schedule: Mondays 5:15-6:45 p.m.
Textbooks:  
   
RAFT-1718 Intro to Sacred Music (1.5 Units) - A practicum in the basics of church music and liturgy. Students will develop skills in listening to and talking about sacred music both as an
historical/cultural phenomenon and in a worship context. The course deals with traditional Western
common practice music as well as world and contemporary genres. Pass/Fail only.
Professor: Daniel Hoggatt
Class Schedule: Fridays 1:30-3 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
FT-1060 Introduction to Ministry (3 Units) - This is a required course for first year students at SFTS. It is an introduction to ministry and the life and work of the church, based upon a contextualized understanding of theology, mission, pastoral care and spiritual formation situated in the realities of race, gender and class. We will look at particular congregations and contexts for ministry in the Bay Area in dialogue with the texts and readings introduced in the course. The course will make use of a variety of learning activities and styles of interaction, including lectures, small groups, site visits and audio-visual presentations. The focus of the course papers and group project is the student's own sense of vocation in conversation with the pastoral and prophetic challenges of Christian ministry today
Professor: Sam Hamilton-Poore
Class Schedule: Mondays 1:30-4:30 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
FT-2070 Presbyterian (U.S.A.) Polity (3 Units) - This hybrid course is intended to familiarize the student with the "Book of Order" of the Presbyterian Church (USA), with particular
emphasis on the Form of Government and the Book of Discipline. We will seek to develop a sense of
the rationale behind Presbyterian polity and its actual function in the life and work of the
church today. The new (proposed) Form of Government of the PC(USA) will also be introduced
as part of the course.
Professor: David Tomlinson, Kathryn Runyeon
Class Schedule: Tuesdays 7-10 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
FT-4661 Interdisciplinary Theological Reflection (3 Units) - Students will learn methods of theological reflection useful for processing critical incidents in ministry. They will reflect on several incidents from their own ministries, choose one for in-depth reflection, select an appropriate method of theological reflection and lead this theological reflection with their peers, as well as participate in reflecting on their peers' critical incidents. They will then write a paper summarizing the entire process. This paper should also reflect learnings from throughout their theological studies as brought to bear on their critical incident as well as student comment and critique. In the second part of the course, students will reflect synthetically on their experience and learnings throughout their theological studies and prepare their personal theology of ministry in the form of a paper. It will be shared with their peers and further revised in light of this feedback. This completed paper may be submitted to the student's ordaining body. Learning strategies include brief lectures (presenting theological reflection models and theology of ministry models), some reading and discussion, small group presentation, discussion and critique of peers' work, two papers. Advanced M.Div. Fulfills SFTS Capstone requirement.
Professor: Elizabeth Liebert
Class Schedule: Mondays 2:10-5 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info


Integrative Studies
   
FE-4011 Internship (0 Units) - The internship provides a supervised ministry context in which the student develops and hones gifts and skills for ministerial leadership. The internship experience is designed to integrate studies and form M.Div. students in the art of ministry--an interactive learning process reflecting the Spirit's work of weaving together the person that God has created and called in Christ through the practice of ministry, theological reflection, spiritual formation, constructive feedback, critique and evaluation.
Professor: Leslie Veen
Class Schedule: NA
Textbooks: NA


Doctor of Ministry
   
DM-6017 Pastor as Person (3 units) - This is a foundational seminar required for SFTS D.Min. students. The course will focus on groups dynamics, personal biography, family history and system, systems theory in the work place, self care, typology, cultural self understanding, spirituality, creative voice and calling. The course objective is to help students creatively address the tensions that exist between their pastoral role and the reality of their human frailty and complexity. [Admission to the SFTS D.Min. program required.]
Professor: Aart van Beek
Class Schedule: Mondays 2-5 p.m.
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
DM-6018 Theology of Ministry (3 Units) - This foundational seminar explores the challenges of and opportunities for ministry in the 21st century, and encourages students to develop the critical skill of theological reflection. Students critique their ministerial role through their own theological experience of content, context and motifs  in Christian ministry.  This course honors diversity and the reality of our shared community with its plethora of experiences, beliefs and values. [Admission to the SFTS D.Min. program required.]
Professor: Martha Taylor
Class Schedule: Mondays 9 a.m.-noon
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
DMPS-6041 Trauma, Loss and Grief (3 Units) - Caring for the bereaved has been at the heart of pastoral ministry. In more recent times, the incident of trauma, violent death and complicated grief is growing.  This course explores current psychological, relational and theological perspectives on loss and grief, life and death, trauma and trust, and healing and hope, as they manifest themselves in individuals, families and congregations.  We will give special attention to the appropriate use of pastoral tools, like ritual, scripture and prayer, in a ministry that focuses on these challenges. [Admission to the SFTS D.Min. program in Pastoral Care required.]
Professor: Scott Sullender
Class Schedule: Mondays 8:30 a.m.-noon
Textbooks: Click here for textbook info
   
DMPS-6051 Theories of Counseling (3 Units) - This fall we will explore the major schools of counseling and related theories of personality.  As we move through this survey course, two questions will guide us.  One, how do people change and grow, and how do we understand change both psychologically and theologically.  Psychotherapy and religion both claim to be systems that help people change.  Secondly, what is pastoral counseling today?  How do we define pastoral counseling in the 21st century?   Through this course, each student will be able to build her or his personal theory of pastoral counseling, including a theory of change. Our eye will be toward building an integrative theory of pastoral care and counseling that fits the context of today's pastoral counselor and the needs of today's parishioner.This seminar is designed specifically for SFTS D.Min. students in the Emphasis in Pastoral Care and Counseling, but is also open to a limited number of students in the Multidisciplinary Emphasis. [Admission to SFTS D.Min. program required.]
Professor: Scott Sullender
Class Schedule: Mondays 1:15-4:30 p.m.

Textbooks:

Click here for textbook info
DMPS-6100 Clinical Practicum (0 Units) - [Admission to the SFTS D.Min. in Pastoral Care required.]
Professor: Scott Sullender
Class Schedule: NA

 
 
 

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San Anselmo CA, 94960
Phone: 415.451.2800
email: info@sfts.edu